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Guest FriendofGreece

Greek coffee is good for you if you want to live long

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Guest FriendofGreece

OK, this article says that Greek coffee is good for longevity, more specifically boiled coffee. It seems to me the Greek coffee is quite condensed, maybe that is the trick also?

 

Although how can people be satisfied drinking just a tiny cup of coffee? I need a whole pot just to wake up in the morning.  :P

 

By the way, is the coffee that Greeks drink grown in Greece?

 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130318151620.htm

 

"The researchers investigated all types of coffee taken by participants -- but interestingly more than 87% of those in the study consumed boiled, Greek coffee daily. More importantly, subjects consuming mainly boiled Greek coffee had better endothelial function than those who consumed other types of coffee. Even in those with high blood pressure, boiled Greek coffee consumption was associated with improved endothelial function, without worrying impacts on blood pressure.

 

"Boiled Greek type of coffee, which is rich in polyphenols and antioxidants and contains only a moderate amount of caffeine, seems to gather benefits compared to other coffee beverages," Siasos concludes."

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Greece is not a coffee producing country. Coffee came to Greece through the Arabs and Turks (as it did to the rest of Europe). The Greek coffee used to be called "Turkish coffee" in earlier times. In fact, I do remember distinctly my grandmother calling it "Turkish coffee" (Τουρκικο) into the 70s and 80s.

 

Apparently, after doing a bit of research, I found out that Greeks started calling this coffee "Greek coffee" during the events of the Turkish invasion of Cyprus around 1973-74 (obviously for nationalistic reasons...).

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Guest FriendofGreece

So, just for me to understand, the Greek coffee nowadays still comes from Turkey or Arab countries? l mean by that that it is not from Brazil, etc. I wonder if we boil Brazilian coffee, for example, it would still be good.

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Not sure where the beans for Greek coffee come from. I'd assume mostly from Brazil, but they could really come from any coffee producing country. The secret is in grinding the beans down to a very fine powder. If you've seen Greek coffee it really looks like a powder, unlike all other types of ground coffee, and it also has a distinct very light brown colour.

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Guest FriendofGreece

I have only seen the Greek coffee in a cup, not when it is dry, but the liquid is light brown like you said.

 

Do you feel the powder when you drink the coffee or is the coffee rather liquid, i.e. that the powder has settled down in the cup before you drink it?

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Guest eyoismos

ένα πολά βαρύ και όχι, 49 φουσκάλες, και κρύο στην μέση

 

and dont laught too hard, ... i actually heard, in crete in some village lost in the past, such an order from a μάγκα with attitude, at the local καφενείο

 

after laughing , .... i realized ... greek coffee does make you feel good

 

he he he he

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