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  1. Not sure if part of the movie is supposed to take place in Mykonos specifically or if they just wanted to show a typical Greek Aegean landscape.
  2. Hey palikari, I'm not angry at you or your opinion When you say that the EU has their own interests at heart, what do you mean? The EU is an economic and political union between a number of European countries (28 I think by now...). It doesn't have any specific self-interests. It promotes and protects the interests of its members. All members (Greece included) have a voice within the EU.
  3. And how exactly did the EU "strangle" (and fucked...) Greece? If anything, Greeks "fucked" themselves hard over the past 25-30 years, since they joined the EU. They collected millions and millions of Euros (and drachmas back in the day) in support from the EU and the Greeks (mostly the politicians and the ruling elite of course...) wasted/spent everything for personal gain. Blaming the EU for this is simply moronic. Don't listen to Tsipras and his cronies. Nobody "fucked" Greece. Greece fucked herself, and by appointing people like Tsipras to represent us as our Prime Minister we continue fucking ourselves in perpetuity.
  4. There are lots of Greeks 2nd, 3rd, 4th generation all over the US and Canada. I've found and spoke to Greeks in the strangest of places. In Hawaii for example (there's a sizeable Greek community too in Honolulu), in several remote small towns in the US and Canada, not to mention of course the big cities where you can find Greeks everywhere (NY, Chicago, Toronto, etc.). Years ago I found a Greek (who owned a restaurant of course...) in some tiny town in northern Canada. We're talking about one of those towns where there's only a main street and some stores and houses built around it - no more than 200-300 people altogether. The guy had married a local girl when he moved there in the 60's and stayed there ever since. He has never gone back to Greece since then, in over 50 years! When I walked in his restaurant and saw a painting of the Acropolis in one corner I knew that the owner was Greek for sure. I asked the server who's the owner and she showed me an old guy working away in the kitchen - and I thought to myself, he's Greek for sure. So I stood up, walked towards the kitchen and casually said "kalispera, ti kaneis?" The guy lifted his head, dropped whatever he was holding, and came running out of the kitchen to hug me. Never seen anything like this before. We were just driving by this time so I didn't have much time to spend with him, but boy was he happy to see me. He was literally in tears the whole time I was there and he was telling me his life story. Over 50 years in a small town in northern Canada, we're talking about far far north. No communication or interaction with any other Greeks in 50 years. He told me he used to write and receive letters from his parents back in the 60's but then his parents died and he lost contact with Greece and anything Greek. He had a loving family in that town, wife and 2 kids (didn't meet the kids but I'd assume they'd be in their 50s). I still remember him to this day - he may be dead by now for all I know - I still remember his happiness to hear someone speaking Greek to him after all those years. I've got several stories about Greeks in Canada and the US. Another time I was having dinner in a small town in British Columbia with my wife and my first born son and I was speaking Greek to him. So an old lady - she must have been in her 80s at the time, we're talking about 2003-2004 - who was sitting next to us leans over and says "you're Greek, aren't you? Unfortunately I don't speak Greek anymore but my father was one of the first Greeks to move to Vancouver in the early 1900s. He got married to a Canadian girl but he never forgot his Greek heritage". And then she started singing a lullaby in Greek to my son who was 2 years old at the time. She said that this was one of the few things she still remembered in Greek since the time she was a kid. Our heritage - not only the Greek heritage of course - is a powerful reminder of where we come from, and many people keep these memories of their heritage close to their heart until they die.
  5. Ετσι. Οποια πετρα κι αν σηκωσεις θα βρες Ελληνα. Εχω βρει Ελληνες στα πιο παραξενα μερη (ειδικα Ελληνες που εχουν μαγαζια, κυριως εστιατορια).
  6. This mythological story below may help answer your question:
  7. admin

    Hello :)

    Γεια σου Περικλη
  8. This list deserves its own post. Let's keep on adding to this list The 21 funniest Greek expressions (and how to use them) 1. A Greek doesn’t say “I have no idea what’s going on”…she says “I’ve lost my eggs and baskets” (ἐχω χἀσει τα αυγἀ και τα καλἀθια). 2. A Greek doesn’t just “make your life hell”…he “makes your life a roller skate” (σου κἀνει την ζωἠ πατἰνι). 3. In Greece, a situation doesn’t just “get out of hand”…it turns into “a whore’s fencepost” (της πουτἀνας το κἀγκελο). 4. A Greek isn’t just “doing nothing”…he’s “swatting flies” (βαρἀει μὐγες). 5. A Greek house isn’t just “messy”…it’s a “brothel” (μπουρδἐλο). 6. A Greek isn’t just “very busy”…she’s “running without arriving” (τρἐχει και δεν φτἀνει). 7. A Greek doesn’t just “irritate you”…she “breaks your nerves” (σου σπἀει τα νεὐρα). 8. In Greece, something isn’t “unbearable…it “can’t be fought” (δεν παλεὐεται). 9. Greeks aren’t just “exhausted”…they are “in pieces” (κομμἀτια). 10. A Greek person isn’t just “high and mighty” or a “diva”…she is “astride a reed” (ἐχει καβαλἠσει καλἀμι). 11. In Greece, people don’t just “turn you down”…they “throw you an X” (σου ἐριξε Χ). 12. A Greek person isn’t just “stupid”…he’s a “brick” (τοὐβλο). 13. A Greek person doesn’t just “cheat on you”…he “puts horns on you” (σε κερατὠνει). 14. A Greek is not told to “go jump in a lake”…he is told to “go see if the boats are moving” (πἠγαινε να δεἰς αν κουνιοὐντε οι βἀρκες). 15. Greeks don’t just “get into a fight”…they “become yarn balls” (γἰναμε μαλλιἀ κουβἀρια). 16. A Greek isn’t just “fit”…she is “slices” (φἐτες). 17. Greeks that are really drunk aren’t “wasted”…they are “pie” (πἰτα). 18. Also, they are “pie” because they “drank their horns” (ἠπια τα κερατἀ μου). 19. In Greece, a place isn’t “really far away”…it’s “by the devil’s mother” (στου διαὀλου την μἀνα). 20. A Greek doesn’t get “beat up”…he “eats wood” (τρὠει ξὐλο). 21. A Greek doesn’t say something incomprehensible is “all Greek to me”…instead, it is “like you are speaking Chinese” (εἰναι σαν να μου μιλἀς Κινἐζικα).
  9. μακαρονια = pasta (not spaghetti). Nice try though Greeks (as usual) seem to think that the word "melomakarono" has an ancient root (μακαρωνία/μακαρία which apparently was some kind of bread given to people after someone's funeral). In any case, this doesn't seem like a probable root for the word μελομακαρονα to me. It's much more likely that the melomakarona evolved from the "macarons" (French desserts - macaroons in English). It's possible that at some point in time someone in Greece (or Asia Minor, as it's possible that the melomakarona came to mainland Greece with the Greeks from Asia Minor) took those "macarons" and soaked them in honey, hence "melo-makarona".
  10. Greeks have lived in what is today Albania for centuries. This is not something new. See here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greeks_in_Albania
  11. I tried to contact him via email a couple of years ago but he never responded. I hope he's ok. In the meantime, we're also missing ajaxmonkey too. He's also gone MIA lately.
  12. I think you answered your own question. It's 3:26am and you're still up and trying to squeeze in one more thing in your day (write a post in this forum) I grew up in a simpler time when our definition of time was quite different. We basically went to school in the morning and then we'd come home in the afternoon and play outside until the sun went down (and oftentimes we kept playing until after the sun went down too...). When I was young the days seemed long, the school year seemed to last forever , but so did the summer break too! Seems to me that the older I get, the faster time seems to go. And don't get me wrong, I'm in no rush to get to the finish line . It just feels that time goes really fast as you grow older. I started realizing this when I was in my early 30s, married with 2 young kids, and it felt as if 24hrs were not enough to accomplish all I needed to do in a day. But then, as I was getting closer to my 40s I realized that I had to change my ways. I had to slow down the pace a bit and enjoy life. It was not easy, but I made some decisions which did change my life and the life of my family. As a start, I decided that no matter what I want to spend a minimum of one month in Greece every summer. This seemed impossible to do at the time, not only because it was difficult to do financially (a trip to Greece every summer for 4 people for a full month would cost us around $20,000), but it was mostly a problem making arrangements with my job at the time to take so much time off at once. As a result, I decided to change my work habits and pick my jobs based on my new requirement. It took me a couple of years to make some lifestyle (and work) adjustments to accommodate all this, but I eventually managed to make this happen. I've been visiting Greece every summer, with my whole family, for the past 10 years for 4-6 weeks long vacations. It was not easy, but it was not that hard to do either. It just took some planning and some determination on my part to change my life. In addition to this, I made several other small lifestyle changes like spending 10-15 minutes every day to slow down and enjoy my coffee (instead of having one on the run). At the end of the day it's our life, and it should be our decision how we'll live it. It's not a rat race. I understand that sometimes we're put into situations where we need to do this, and then this, and then that...work longer hours to make more money so that you can pay the rent or the mortgage or your car payment or whatever else. But what if we would stop for a minute, and think what do we really need? What's more important to us? And then prioritize, and make choices and decisions based on what really matters. It's not easy, but it's not that hard either to make life-changing decisions. It's just a matter of wanting to do it. Your life is yours to live, and your (short...) time on this earth is yours to enjoy.
  13. admin

    Hello :)

    Hey, welcome back. We need you guys posting more often. Dino and I do write some posts in the forum from time to time but we're more active in Hellenism's Facebook account. Eyo is MIA since a couple of years ago. No idea what happened to him.
  14. This is really bullshit, especially when dealing with someone who doesn't feel that whatever he did was wrong. This guy should rot in jail. It's really upsetting reading this news.
  15. Hi Gian, I cannot see this image. Can you please upload it somewhere and then provide the link?
  16. Just back from Greece. In fact, I was at a beach close by to Mati when the fire happened (I was in Vouliagmeni). The loss of life is just shocking.
  17. Για εμας που ζουμε στο εξωτερικο ειναι δυσκολο να καταλαβουμε τις τρελες χρεωσεις της ΔΕΗ σε αυτους τους λογαριασμους. Φετος το καλοκαιρι ημουν στην Ελλαδα και κοιταζα το λογαριασμο ενος φιλου απο ενα διαμερισμα το οποιο ειναι κλειστο (δεν νοικιαζεται και δε ζει κανενας εκει) για το οποιο επρεπε να πληρωσει γυρω στα 200 Ευρω στη ΔΕΗ, ολα αχετα με καταναλωση ρευματος.
  18. I can't help but laugh with my fellow Greeks when I see protests of this type. The thing is that most Greeks are pretty much ignorant of their history (in this case, their own family history too), but this doesn't really justify this kind of stupidity. What I'm saying is that this kind of a "nationalistic" themed protest is stupid because I'm pretty sure that the vast majority of the people participating in this specific protest have absolutely nothing to do "racially" with the ancient Macedonians. The vast majority of the people living in Northern Greece these days are mostly people with roots in Asia Minor and also Pontian Greeks. So basically someone with family roots in the Black Sea protests against a bunch of Slavic people who want to call themselves Macedonians (and who may be natives to this specific land, or if not natives at least inhabitants of these lands for much much longer than the protestors' Pontian or Asian Minor ancestors...) while obviously none of the two arguing sides have really anything to do with the ancient Macedonians. It's almost comical if you think about it this way. Saying this, I do not agree with naming this country (FYROM currently) Macedonia, or New Macedonia, or North Macedonia, or name it by whatever other name uses the term "Macedonia" as part of the country name, for other reasons. They can very well call their country "Slavicland" and possibly name their southern province "Slavic Macedonia".
  19. This is all bullshit. The reality is this: Skopjie did get what they wanted in terms of the name (North Macedonia). This may open a can of warms in the future if (most likely when...) a more conservative/nationalistic prime minister comes into power again in FYROM. If there's a North Macedonia then surely there's a South Macedonia which should be seceded from Greece and join their "North" Macedonia brethren. People of North Macedonia are not going to be called North Macedonians (as they should). Instead, for some strange reason, they'll be just called Macedonians. I guess the next question is, what's going to happen to the Greek Macedonians living in the region of Macedonia (Greece). What are they going to be called? On top of this, there is a number of Greek products in the market for decades using the "Macedonia" name (Macedonian wines, various Macedonian good etc.) all produced in the Macedonia region of Greece. What's going to happen to all these products and companies now if the term "Macedonian" can only refer to people or products of FYROM? Expect this to become a major issue soon. There's much more than this, of course, this is just the surface. I can safely bet that this whole thing is going to come back and bite us Greeks in the ass very soon. Tsipras and his cronies will be long gone by then of course, but the damage they inflicted in the Greek psyche is unimaginable.
  20. What's shocking is that 16.5 percent of the respondents of this poll are still planning to vote for Syriza. The stupidity of some people is beyond belief.
  21. What happened today should be a political suicide for Tsipras. It's really beyond comprehension why he personally pushed for this agreement to move forward so quickly knowing full well that the majority of Greeks do not agree with this. There must be more in play here, other than pressure from the EU and US. Also, it's sad that this dispute was resolved so quickly - and not to our benefit or advantage - while the issue in Cyprus is ongoing for decades and nobody has shown any real interest to push Turkey to resolve it. I guess Greece is easy to push around (especially the Tsipras government as it seems...). I'm pretty certain that what happened today will bite us in the ass one day. There have been countless useless politicians who have hurt Greece one way or the other over the years, but Tsipras and his government have done more damage in the few years they're in power than all other useless politician put together in decades. I can't blame the Greek people for falling for this crook as I fell for Syriza too hoping that they'd really do things differently and bring real change. We didn't expect that Tsipras and his crew would end up being so incompetent.
  22. The reality is that at this point in time Greece has nothing to gain from this agreement. Absolutely nothing. FYROM however, stands to gain a lot (including a possible inclusion in the EU etc.). The timing of all this is strange too. Greece is dealing with other more pressing issues, including the relations with Turkey, internal strife, unemployment etc. etc. One wonders then, why the SYRIZA government decided to make this a priority in their agenda these days? More so when they have really nothing to gain from this politically. This will, in fact, do more damage to them than good as this is a very sensitive issue for most Greeks, SYRIZA supporters included.
  23. Are you in Greece? Monastiraki is a hub, so everybody hangs out there after they come out of the train etc. I don't think it's that bad. In fact, if you walk behind the train station you'll find a cool gelato place (I think it's called DaVinci). They make the best gelato in Athens. You have to try it.
  24. It's pretty bad for the Greeks for sure. But from what I'm reading the agreement hasn't been signed yet. Seems that both sides are not 100% happy with it. Let's see what happens.

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