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Guest AnnaAngeli

Greek Family

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Guest AnnaAngeli

Hi Everybody!

 

I'm doing a report for a class on Greek culture. I was wondering if anybody might be willing to share some information about Greek traditions within your family. I hope you have a great day!

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Hi Anna,

 

Are we talking about Greek families in Greece or outside Greece (US,Canada, Germany, Australia etc.). There are differences there. As there are also differences on the traditions of Greek families in Athens, the Greek islands, northern Greece etc. Basically each area has its own traditions, some shared some not.

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Guest eyoismos

essentially, anna , admin is saying that you are effectively asking how long is a piece of string

 

:P

 

(just messing with you)

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Guest AnnaAngeli

Lol. No worries, eyoismos. I'm actually looking for information about American Greek families. 

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Here's a quick list of shared traditions I can think of:

 

  1. Greek food - Greek families continue making Greek traditional dishes like pastitsio, mousaka etc.
  2. Greek language - many Greek-American families preserve the Greek language in their house or when they get together with other Greeks.
  3. Religion - most Greeks in the US remain close to their Greek orthodox faith
  4. Greek weddings - they're pretty connected to the Greek orthodox religion tradition but in most cases Greek weddings in the US are pretty extravagant celebrations
  5. Greek baptisms - same as above
  6. Greek dancing/Greek parties - traditional or modern (laika) Greeks go nuts in parties. Lots of food and drink and dancing until the early hours. This is most likely why most neighbours love (or hate if they're not invited to the party...) living next to Greeks.
  7. Caring for the elderly

I guess a good reference would be the film My Big Fat Greek Wedding which did capture a lot of traditions shared by most Greek-American/Greek-Canadian families (even though some of them exaggerated to get a few extra laughs...).

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Guest AnnaAngeli

Thanks so much for the information! Would you mind telling me a little bit about the food that might be eaten at weddings and other important events?

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There's a number of "traditional" dishes that I'm seeing in most celebrations, such as pastitsio, spanakopita, tiropita, lamb (especially during Easter), keftedakia (meatballs), Greek salad etc.

 

Weddings are a bit different as they're not done in somebody's house so it's usually not Greeks preparing the menus. So in most wedding you'd see the usual dishes served in most North American weddings.

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Guest //Ιωσήφ96//

Hi Anna !

 

I agree with a great majority of the above. If I were to add anything, I would make the point that although there are perhaps a great amount of Greek-American families holding onto the Greek traditions, culture, language, etc. there are

families who would gradually loose these holdings of 'Greekness,' for a lack of a better word, due to assimilation over the generations. I would think that, especially in America, this would be the case for some as the U.S is a very strong example for a country emphasizing a 'melting pot'  nationality > ethnicity oriented type of ideology.  If anything, I would say American nationalim is one of the most influential/successful at assimilation, if not the most.

 

Hope this helps =) 

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Guest eyoismos

.........the U.S is a very strong example for a country emphasizing a 'melting pot'  nationality > ethnicity oriented type of ideology.  If anything, I would say American nationalim is one of the most influential/successful at assimilation, if not the most.

 

 

It’s interesting how centuries of immigration, warfare, assimilation, and admixture are summed up as food analogies: “America is a mixing bowl,” my grade school teachers would declare, reflecting the tail-end of early 20th Century philosophy on new Americans assimilating (read: “acting more like a now-accepted white ethnic group”), abandoning their parents’ language, and learning about weird white person shit like advent calendars, James Spader, and cotillion balls.

 

Soon after, in school we were taught to emphasize multiculturalism. The mixing bowl was put back in the pantry. My parents wrote impassioned letters to Yankee Ridge Elementary School on behalf of all the immigrant families that DIDN’T celebrate the birth of Jeebus. Time to teach “America is a fruit salad!” We’re a mixture that celebrates our individual components! Hooray!

 

The analogy is a noble one, save for the fact that fruit salad is gross. You end up eating only the bananas and the kiwi, while ignoring the tannin-bomb grapes, which inevitably roll off your church-basement-quality paper plate. The cantaloupes are always rock hard, the strawberries white and tart. Paella! Now there’s a multicultural food analogy I can get behind, Lena Dunham’s idiocy about the dish be damned!

 

I don’t hang out much in elementary schools as much anymore (THANKS A LOT, MEGAN’S LAW), so I can only guess that what they’re teaching is some sort of “America is a farm-to-table, neo-liberal/pro-business, domestic partnership!”

 

So basically, Duck Dynasty, but without all the backwoods buttfucking.

 

 

As a rule, unfortunately, life is harder for ethnic minorities. The brothers didn’t disguise their resentment towards societal prejudice of their profession. I asked where their family was from, and they said İstanbul, by way of Nevşehir. (Nevşehir province is home to world-famous Kapadokya). Kozma said he was tired of people asking where they were “really” from, since he points out that his family has been in Anatolia longer than most. “When people ask me where I’m from,” he said, “I usually just say ‘my mom’s pussy.’”

 

http://ieatwithmyhands.com/2013/12/20/eating-pork-in-turkey/

 

basically the myth of the USA and the delusion of melting pots is just that .... bullshit wearing horse blinkers ...the states doesnt havent a clue what melting pot is, unless its on her own terms and self glorifying definitions ...and has pretty much the same characteristics as in turkey, but from another perspective

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