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Guest eyoismos

those little details tat give you the shits with restaurants

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Guest Celestis

I cook a lot with  Basmati rice and i like it ... but Jasmine rice good too ... also the Japanese rice is nice i will order some of that to cook at home it will go better with some of the meals i make 

 

I also i try coral rice and black wild rice .. i cook a lot with brown rice too ..but i am the only one i eat that at home lol 

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Guest eyoismos

thanks a lot girls ...for making me feel hungry

 

so i did my traditional in the middle of the night paratrooper raid on the fridge ...and ...

 

sigh! ....

 

left over delicious indian take-away ....and a couple of heavenly pieces of baklava

 

take a wild guess what i stuffed my face with

:P

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Guest FriendofGreece

Wow, Celestis, like you said, you like to try different things. Good for you.

 

Eyoismos, I skipped reading one of your posts. Well, in Canada, there are few Greektowns, so you have to make do with what you have. For example, chalky Canadian feta cheese.  ;)

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Guest eyoismos

its still day time there in aoustralia ..... of you go to the nearest deli and succumb to your temptations

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Guest eyoismos

whats stopping you to do the same?

winter has already hit canada and you have to fight a blizzard to get to the goodies?

:)

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Guest eyoismos

thanks a lot ... now the temptation is to ask you to show yourself in a bikini

 

but i wont .... because you will probably give me one of these .... dope-slap.gif

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Guest FriendofGreece

I only see baklava in Greek or Lebanese restaurants. It is not sold in the grocery stores. Or maybe in the frozen food section? I have to double check next time. OK, near summer time? Now, I am really jealous.  :D

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Guest eyoismos

ok ...time gor a little histroy lesson

 

from wiki .....

 

 

The history of baklava is not well documented. There are three proposals for the pre-Ottoman roots of baklava: the Central Asian Turkic tradition of layered breads,[14] the Roman placenta cake, as developed through Byzantine cuisine,[15] or the Persian lauzinaq.[16]

 

Although the history of baklava is not well documented, there is evidence that its current form was developed in the imperial kitchens of the Topkapı Palace in Istanbul.[17] The Sultan presented trays of baklava to the Janissaries every 15th of the month of Ramadan in a ceremonial procession called the Baklava Alayı.[16][18]

 

The oldest (2nd century BCE) recipe that resembles a similar dessert is the honey covered baked layered-dough dessert placenta of Roman times, which Patrick Faas identifies as the origin of baklava: "The Greeks and the Turks still argue over which dishes were originally Greek and which Turkish. Baklava, for example, is claimed by both countries. Greek and Turkish cuisine both built upon the cookery of the Byzantine Empire, which was a continuation of the cooking of the Roman Empire. Roman cuisine had borrowed a great deal from the ancient Greeks, but placenta (and hence baklava) had a Latin, not a Greek, origin—please note that the conservative, anti-Greek Cato left us this recipe."[15][19]

 

Shape the
placenta
as follows: place a single row of
tracta
along the whole length of the base dough. This is then covered with the mixture [cheese and honey] from the mortar. Place another row of
tracta
on top and go on doing so until all the cheese and honey have been used up. Finish with a layer of
tracta.
… place the placenta in the oven and put a preheated lid on top of it … When ready, honey is poured over the placenta.
— Cato the Elder,
160 BC
 

Some sources state that this Roman dessert continued to evolve during the Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Empire into modern baklava.[21] In Greek the word plakous (Greek: πλακοῦς) was used for Latin placenta,[22] and the American scholar Speros Vryonis describes one type of plakous, koptoplakous (Byzantine Greek: κοπτοπλακοῦς), as a "Byzantine favorite" and "the same as the Turkish baklava",[23] as do other writers.[24]

 

Muhammad bin Hasan al-Baghdadi was a compiler from the Abbasid period who described lauzinaq, a dessert similar to baklava in his cookbook Kitab Al-Tabikh. Lauzinaq refers to small pieces of almond paste wrapped in very thin pastry and drenched in syrup. Written in 1226 (in today's Iraq), it was based on a collection of 9th century Persian-inspired recipes.[16] According to Gil Marks, Middle Eastern pastry makers developed the process of layering the ingredients; he asserts that "some scholars said they were influenced by Mongols or Turks".[16] The only original manuscript of Al-Baghdadi's book survives at the Süleymaniye Library in Istanbul (Turkey) and according to Charles Perry, "for centuries, it had been the favorite cookbook of the Turks". A further 260 recipes had been added to the original by Turkish compilers at an unknown date retitling it as Kitâbü’l-Vasfi’l-Et‘ime el-Mu‘tâde, and two of its known three copies can be found now at the Topkapı Palace Library in Istanbul. Eventually, Muhammad ibn Mahmud al-Shirwani, the physician of the Ottoman Sultan Murad II prepared a Turkish translation of the book, adding around 70 contemporary recipes.[citation needed]

 

Another recipe for a similar dessert is güllaç, a dessert found in the Turkish cuisine and considered by some as the origin of baklava.[25] It consists of layers of phyllo dough that are put one by one in warmed up milk with sugar. It is served with walnut and fresh pomegranate and generally eaten during Ramadan. The first known documentation of güllaç is attested in a food and health manual, written in 1330 that documents Mongol foods called Yinshan Zhengyao (飮膳正要, Important Principles of Food and Drink), written by Hu Sihui, an ethnic Mongol court dietitian of the Yuan dynasty.[7]Uzbek cuisine has pakhlava, puskal or yupka or in Tatar yoka, which are sweet and salty savories (boreks) prepared with 10–12 layers of dough.[13]

 

There are also some similarities between baklava and the Ancient Greek desserts gastris (γάστρις),[26]kopte sesamis (κοπτὴ σησαμίς), and kopton (κοπτόν) found in book XIV of the Deipnosophistae.[27][28] However, the recipe there is for a filling of nuts and honey, with a top and bottom layer of honey and ground sesame similar to modern pasteli or halva, and no dough, certainly not a flaky dough.[29]

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Guest eyoismos

 

Regional variations

In Turkey, baklava is traditionally made by filling between the layers of dough with pistachios, walnuts, almonds (parts of the Aegean Region) or a special preparation called "kaymak" (not to be confused with kaymak). In the Black Sea Region hazelnuts are commonly used as a filling for baklava.[31] The city of Gaziantep in southeast Turkey is famous for its pistachio baklava and it regards itself as the native city for this dish, though it only appears to have been introduced to Gaziantep from Damascus in 1871.[32] In 2008, the Turkish patent office registered a geographical indication for Antep Baklava,[33] and in 2013, Antep Baklavası or Gaziantep Baklavası was registered as a Protected Geographical Indication by the European Commission.[34] In many parts of Turkey, baklava is often topped with kaymak or, in the summer, ice cream (milk cream flavour, called "kaymaklı dondurma").

 

In Greece, baklava is supposed to be made with 33 dough layers, referring to the years of Christ's life.[35]

 

In Azerbaijan, Azerbaijani pakhlava is made with walnuts or almonds. It is usually cut in a rhombus shape. It is traditionally served during the spring holiday of Nowruz.

 

In Armenia, paklava is made with cinnamon and cloves.[36]

 

In Iran, a drier version of baklava is cooked and presented in smaller diamond-shaped cuts flavored with rose water. The cities of Yazd and Qazvin are famous for their baklava, which is widely distributed in Iran.[37] Persian baklava uses a combination of chopped almonds and pistachios spiced with cardamom and a rose water-scented syrup and is lighter than other Middle Eastern versions.[9][38]Azerbaijani pakhlava is widely eaten in Iran, especially in Iranian Azerbaijan.

 

In Syria, baklava is prepared from phyllo dough sheets, butter, walnuts and sugar syrup. It is cut into lozenge pieces.[39]

 

In the Maghreb, mainly Libya, Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco, the pastry was brought along many others by the Ottomans, and is prepared differently depending on the regions and cities.[40]

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Guest FriendofGreece

Thanks for the info, Eyoismos. I agree with Jen though. The Greek version is tastier, crunchier, nuttier. The Lebanese version I have eaten does not have "bite".

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Guest Celestis

If i want Greek cakes i have to think well first before i get some ....  the one that is closer is 40 minutes away or longer if there is traffic 

Melbourne must have many places or i don't know where they are lol

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Guest FriendofGreece

Are there special ingredients that Australians use that we may not find in other countries' cuisines, what would be some examples?

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Guest eyoismos

yeah well ... here in zambia we have other "proteins"

 

Insects such as grasshoppers, caterpillars, cicadas and flying ants are delicacies. During the rainy season, Zambians look forward to the once-a-year feast of fried termites . and then there are the Mopane worms

 

but i wouldnt be caught dead eating any of those. I like my proteins from way more conventional sources

 

:P

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Guest FriendofGreece

I have read about people eating insects and worms, but not termites. One thing I can say is there must not be any bed bugs left there. 

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Guest eyoismos

hahahaha

 

yeah ....well .... no ... fine

 

lets say some bugs are food but most are ....bugs

 

:P

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Guest FriendofGreece

How would people even know which bugs are good to eat? They are all bugs. Some people even eat cockroaches, for their medicinal value.

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If i want Greek cakes i have to think well first before i get some ....  the one that is closer is 40 minutes away or longer if there is traffic 

Melbourne must have many places or i don't know where they are lol

In Oakleigh:

Vanilla

Nikos Cakes

 

In Doncaster: Melissa Cakes

 

In the City: Diethnes Cakes ( lonsdale st)

 

Richmond:  Hellas Cakes

 

Coburg: axellion Cake shop

 

 

just a few at the top of my head 

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Guest eyoismos

How would people even know which bugs are good to eat? They are all bugs. Some people even eat cockroaches, for their medicinal value.

 

from the experience of thousands of generations

 

and let me give you an example ... potatoes .... how did humanity figure out not to eat potatoes when they turn green ?

 

same thing

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Guest FriendofGreece

So it goes as follows at the beginning ... Any volunteer(cobeye) to try this delicate worm? It is hairy but maybe it tastes good and is good for the health.

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Guest Celestis

In Oakleigh:

Vanilla

Nikos Cakes

 

In Doncaster: Melissa Cakes

 

In the City: Diethnes Cakes ( lonsdale st)

 

Richmond:  Hellas Cakes

 

Coburg: axellion Cake shop

 

 

just a few at the top of my head 

this all must be in Melbourne  i am in Sydney

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