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Guest PatrickT

Endgame

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Guest PatrickT

It is good to finally see light at the end of the tunnl. That entire quagmire wasted enough rescources not only from germany but all honest EU nations.

 

Tsipras and his clowns promised the greeks huge gifts and he did believe hard working europeans would pay greek luxury pensions. Chancellor Merkel can´t allow help for greece. 80% of the Bundestag said they would vote no for any new greek help package.

 

What will happen now? Most likely a few more senseless debates and then it happens. The moment greece leaves the Euro and EU it is a failed state. Unable to pay pensions and salaries. It will be bancrupt and not even able to hold police and hospitals open. The public service will collpse. Over night it will basicly become a 3rd world country. 

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Well, we'll see about that. There are a few more days left to strike a deal. Even though I also think that we're going for Grexit I can never be sure about what's discussed behind closed doors. Politics is a strange game, and many political decision made over the centuries are not based on common sense or our understanding of reality. Those people live in a different reality than the rest of us.

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Guest PatrickT

Well, we'll see about that. There are a few more days left to strike a deal. Even though I also think that we're going for Grexit I can never be sure about what's discussed behind closed doors. Politics is a strange game, and many political decision made over the centuries are not based on common sense or our understanding of reality. Those people live in a different reality than the rest of us.

 

 

We want no deal. The majority in germany demands the grexit. The people here don´t want that one single € is wasted on this middle eastern country anymore. German parlamentarian Wolfgang Bosbach said in TV: "Birds build nests, moles dig holes, greeks steal money, thats a law of nature and it is ridicolous to believe this country could be civilized".

 

Hard words propably but i think the big part of germans thinks same way. We will see what happens.

 

Best option would be  grexit and then dissolution of the greek state. Greece is unable to fullfill its duties. The EU will take over and takes over control. That way police and hospitals would still be operated. We can decide later what we do with the land. 

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Guest PatrickT

:lol: laughable...

 

 

Why? Do you want greece drop on the state of somalia? Greece is a failed state per definition and a relative new one. It did not work out as planned so a new arrangement can be found. 

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Greece is a sovereign democratic country, much like Germany is. Nobody can take control of Greece or decide for her fate other than Greeks themselves.

If the Greeks (or the EU) decide that it's best for Greece to leave the Euro and the EU then so be it. There's not going to be any dissolution and no taking over by anyone.

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Guest eyoismos

why do you even waste your time with this troll who repeatedly embraces as gospel the utterances of the inheritors of the "Ministry of Public Enlightenment and Propaganda", and its founding father Goebbels,  aka the Bild,
 
prime example ... all that crap about luxary pensions
 
fact is

Nearly 45% of Greece’s 2.5 million retirees now live on incomes of less than €665 a month – below the poverty line defined by the EU. Over half that number fell below the threshold at the start of the crisis in late 2009. Only a fraction of the 1.4 million people out of work receive unemployment benefits.
source: UK Guardian

 
some fucking Shangri La
 

honest EU nations

:rolleyes: yeah right ...especially germany, or should i say german companies, the driving force behind germany .... and their perpetual "correct way of doing corruption"
 
fact is, .... and i repeat the age old saying ... lies, damn lies and statistics ...and fucking around with numbers is the bild's forte ...they consistently  and repeatably do that ..... and idiots buy into it all
 
we wont even go into the possible scenarios dreamed up in the past ....like ....
 
Shocking German Article: “In Berlin They Even Consider Military Coup Scenarios for Greece”
 
or even the more recent article
The Dirty Little Secret of Berlin’s Bankers

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Guest eyoismos

food for thought ... and i emphasize this ...as possible reality (not definite reality)

 

MYTH #1: The Greeks are profligate

 

The unquestioned assumption in the international media is that the Greek debt crisis was caused by excessive state expenditure, an overburdened welfare state and an inflated public sector.

 

TRUTH #1: The Greek welfare state is actually anemic

 

Here are the facts:

 

Public spending: according to the Center for American Progress, public spending in Greece is only 44.6% of GDP. This is lower than the EU average, lower than Germany’s 46.6% and considerably lower than Sweden’s 55%.

Tax collection: the real problem is not social expenditure on the poor but the lack of tax collection from the rich. From 2001 to 2007, Greece collected only an average of 39.4% of GDP in taxes, compared to the EU 44.4% average.

 

MYTH #2: The Greeks are lazy

 

Another unquestioned assumption is that the Greeks don’t work enough — they retire at 50, take crazy amounts of paid holidays and lie around in the sun drinking ouzo most of the day. Angela Merkel, for example, recently called on the people of southern Europe to “work more, play less“, i.e. work more hours, retire earlier and take less holidays.

 

TRUTH #2: The Greeks actually work most of all Europeans

 

Here are the facts:

 

Hours worked per week: According to Eurostat data of 2005, the Greeks worked 43.1 hours per week (compared to 35.7 hours in so-called ‘thrifty’ Germany, with its much-touted ‘Protestant work ethic’).

Hours worked per year: More recent OECD data shows the Greeks to work an average of 2,119 hours per year — 690 hours more than the average German, 467 more than the average Brit and 356 more than the OECD average. In fact, out of all OECD countries, only the Koreans work more.

Amount of paid holidays: The paid leave entitlement in Greece is 23 days per year. This is actually below the EU average, and significantly lower than the minimum of 28 days in the UK and 30 (!) days in Germany.

Retirement age: Again, Eurostat data from 2005, shows the average age of exit from the labour force in Greece to be 61.7. This was higher than in Germany, France or Italy and higher than the EU27 average. It is being raised even further now as a part of the EU-IMF bailout conditions.

 

MYTH #3: The Greeks are spoilt

 

In a truly terrible piece of journalism earlier this week, Sean O’Grady (economics editor of The Independent) wrote that “for many in northern Europe, the rioting in Athens must remind them of a tantrum by a spoilt child.” He refers specifically to popular opposition to the cutting of the so-called “13th and 14th salary” as a key indicator of this ‘spoiltness’.

 

TRUTH #3: The Greeks suffer more than anyone else

 

Here are the facts:

 

According to Eurostat, even before crisis, in 2008, one in five Greeks (among them almost half a million children) lived under the formal poverty line of 500 euros per month.

An independent survey by Kapa Research and the London School of Economics found even worse data: a third of the Greek population now live in formal poverty (and mind you: this was in 2007 – it’s actually gotten a lot worse since as a result of these draconian austerity measures).

Every child in Greece is born with a 40,000 euro debt on their name.

Greece’s youth are now referred to in the country as Generation 700: because that’s the maximum monthly wage that young Greeks will typically make – that is, if they are lucky enough to find a job: according to the Financial Times, over 35 percent of young Greeks is out of work right now.

The so-called 13th and 14th salaries (Christmas, Easter and summer bonuses) are not additional salaries. As a Greek reader on this blog, Amalia, pointed out: “Greeks do not get two extra salaries a year; their annual salary is simply divided by 14 and they get two installments at Christmas, one and half at Easter and one and a half sometime in the summer.”

The Dutch get a 13th month worth of salary and Austria has a 14th month. Since these countries are not experiencing a similar budget crisis, this simply can’t be the cause of Greece’s debt.

The bottomline is: it doesn’t matter in how many installments you receive your salary (whether it’s in 12, 13, 14 or 2,000 parts); what matters is your annual salary. As long as you make less than 6,000 euros a year (as is the case for 20 percent of Greeks) you live in poverty — period.

Living costs in Greece are the highest of all of Europe.

As a result of this lethal combination of low wages and high living costs, millions of Greeks are forced to work two or three jobs just to survive.

Since last year’s bailout, the Greek economy contracted almost 5%, 50,000 to 65,000 business have been closed, unemployment increased by 400,000, industrial activity declined by 11%, the construction sector contracted by 73%. Partly as a result, suicide rates are reported to have nearly tripled.

All in all, this is a humanitarian tragedy of unprecedented proportions. How could Mr. O’Brady possibly keep a straight face arguing that the people experiencing all of the above, are somehow spoilt children?

 

MYTH #4 — the bailout is helping the Greek people

 

Part of O’Brady’s logic assumes that the Greeks should actually be grateful for receiving EU money in return for austerity measures. After all, EU taxpayers are footing the bill for the failures of the Greek people, no?

 

TRUTH #4: — it’s an indirect subsidy for Europe’s insolvent banks

 

Here are the facts:

 

First of all, the bailout is not a handout: the Greek people don’t actually benefit from the EU-IMF bailout. Even if the bailout money really did go to the Greeks, this wouldn’t necessarily be beneficial for the Greek people at all. After all, the bailout is a loan for which the EU and IMF charge an exorbitant 8 percent interest rate, meaning northern European tax payers and the IMF should make a handsome profit from their so-called ‘rescue aid’, while the Greeks will only be further indebted by it.

The bailout serves not Greece but Europe’s insolvent banks: as former IMF Chief Economist Kenneth Rogoff pointed out last year already, “a lot of European banks are insolvent.” The real problem of the European crisis isn’t the fiscal crisis in the periphery, it’s the financial crisis in the banking sector of the core.

Private bank exposure to Greek sovereign debt: BNP Paribas: 5bn – 7 percent of equity; Société Générale: 2,5bn – 6 percent of equity; Postbank: 1,2bn – 21 percent of equity; Kommerzbank: 2,9bn – 27 percent of total equity. That’s just a handful. More data here.

Central Bank exposure to Greek debt: the European Central Bank has 190bn of exposure to Greek debt.

ECB close to insolvency: according to a recent report by Open Europe, asset losses as small as 4.25% could tip the ECB into insolvency. Greek default alone would chip 2.35% to 3.47% off of the ECB’s capital base. Add in a Portuguese or Irish default and you have the European Central Bank – the flagship of European capitalism – literally going bankrupt.

 

But no one really seems to care about Europe’s ailing banks and the ECB. Indeed, hardly anyone is talking about it. Instead, we prefer to talk about the handful of Greek workers who retire at 50, the ‘spoilt children’ who refuse to accept the EU’s generous aid packages.

 

By narrowly channeling our ire onto the suffering people of Greece, we have completely lost sight of the infinitely larger structural problems we face in the European Union. Our private banks are insolvent. Our central bank is on the verge of bankruptcy. This is the real crisis.

 

Yet apparently, in all this misery and chaos, bashing the Greeks seems like an infinitely more enjoyable pastime for Europe’s populist politicians and the factually illiterate international media.

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Guest PatrickT

Greece is a sovereign democratic country, much like Germany is. Nobody can take control of Greece or decide for her fate other than Greeks themselves.

If the Greeks (or the EU) decide that it's best for Greece to leave the Euro and the EU then so be it. There's not going to be any dissolution and no taking over by anyone.

greece is bancrupt. you do realize what that means do you? that all hospitals, police, army...the entire public close down. that means no security, no water, no healthcare. You want drop on the level of somalia or get help to allow the most basic services running? Of course there will be emergency teams taking over public service to keep it halfway running.

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Guest eyoismos

headlines in german newspapers in the recent past

 

bild: "Why are we paying the luxury pensions of the Greeks"

 

spiegel: "The myth of the Greek luxury pensioners"

 

take a wild guess which one is the bullshit magazine

and which one is the respectable one

 

guess which one the propaganda jockey here on hellenism tries to convince us of as valid

 

guess who's opinions mean jack shit to most normal thinking individuals

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Guest eyoismos

 

The tabloid Bild ran a headline in February — “Stop! No more billions for greedy Greeks” — printed on a European blue background, and appealed to readers to take a selfie with the page and send it to the paper’s website. That was as much to boost site traffic and make people talk about Bild as to influence debate. The day after, Bundestag deputies debated the extension of the EU bailout to Greece — or rather its creditors. Without it, the Greek government would have been unable to pay the interest on its debt and would have had to leave the eurozone. The right-leaning part of Angela Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union (CDU) ardently supports a Greek exit, as does Axel Springer, the media giant that owns Bild and since the 1950s has backed the German right.

The German upper middle class look down on Bild or ignore it. Yet its news nuggets-and-pinups formula sells 2.2m copies a day (1), making Bild the best-selling tabloid in Europe. It supplies a ready-made ideology that pits hard-working, hard-saving, CDU-voting Germans against the world — especially leftwingers, Muslims and foreigners. The enemy has had various incarnations: the paper has targeted communists, pacifists, terrorists, Arabs and Russians. But in the past five years more attention has been focused on the Greeks, with Bild accusing them of being lazy cheats trying to jeopardise things even more sacrosanct than law and order — the taxpayer, and currency stability.

The headlines in the first months of the eurozone crisis make the rightwing French weekly Valeurs Actuelles seem reticent. “Who’s to blame for the crisis? Greece!”; “How the Greeks spend our wonderful euros”; “Not one cent for Greece”; “It’s their fault!”; “They don’t need our help”; “The Greeks are begging for our billions”; “Who can still believe in the Greeks?”; “Save the euro!” and so on. The headlines are a long, unpleasant sequence, leading from luxury pensioners and ouzo drinkers in 2010 to the “greedy Greeks” of today. Such a hammering must have consequences. The paper may have lost half its print readership over the past 15 years but it’s still read by 10 million German speakers, and the website had 17.8 million unique visitors just in February.

Though many Germans find Bild distasteful, politicians rarely do. Both Merkel and her finance minister, Wolfgang Schäuble, regularly give it interviews. Oskar Lafontaine, a former heavyweight in the Social Democratic Party (SPD) and founder of Die Linke (the Left Party), wrote a weekly column, as did Peter Gauweiler, former secretary of state in the Bavarian interior ministry.

The porous boundary between Bild and the political elite was clear in 2013 when Peer Steinbrück, the SPD candidate for chancellor in the federal elections, poached Bild journalist Rolf Kleine as his campaign spokesman. Given the tone of Kleine’s articles (which include the co-authorship of “Sell off your islands, you bankrupt Greeks, and the Acropolis too”), it is hard to see how he could have promoted hope in a leftwing alternative. Bild’s owners didn’t hold it against him, for after Kleine made his contribution to the SPD’s electoral failure, he returned to its political desk.

Since Syriza came to power in Greece, Bild has intensified its Greek-bashing: its favourite target is finance minister Yanis Varoufakis, who has been called “boor”, “poster-boy”, “lying Greek”, “rapacious Greek” and “far-left naked bike rider”. The name-calling may seem amusing but it raises the issue of how much influence these attacks have on German society. Polls reveal growing hostility to Greece, with 52% of Germans in favour of excluding it from the eurozone, and 80% believing that the Tsipras government is “not serious” (2). The blame cannot be laid entirely on Bild, for the mainstream print media share the underlying premise. They are in favour of a strong euro and budgetary discipline, and criticise the Greek government; even the centre-left Die Zeit has called it“completely irresponsible”.

As the self-proclaimed advocate of the euro and of simple folk, an institution for the propertied classes and a “printed defence for the people” (3), Bild may provide a useful mash-up of the economic consensus, but its influence has its limits. The selfie campaign failed to stop the Bundestag approving the Greek bailout extension, and was quickly withdrawn. A month later, during Alexis Tsipras’s visit to Berlin, Bild tried to make amends with the headline “50 reasons to like Greece”. They included olive oil, Nana Mouskouri, muesli with yoghurt and Asterix at the Olympic Games.

 

in the 1940 era it was the big bad jew that was the reason for germany's woes

these days it has been decided by some , that its the big bad greeks that are a threat to germany

 

like i said repeatedly .... echo's of 1940+ .... and our resident tosser tries desperately to persuade us continuously

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Guest PatrickT

headlines in german newspapers in the recent past

 

bild: "Why are we paying the luxury pensions of the Greeks"

 

spiegel: "The myth of the Greek luxury pensioners"

 

take a wild guess which one is the bullshit magazine

and which one is the respectable one

 

guess which one the propaganda jockey here on hellenism tries to convince us of as valid

 

guess who's opinions mean jack shit to most normal thinking individuals

 

Maybe it is your old age that you are unable to understand arguments and bring up Bild Zeitung. I don´t care about Bild or any other media outlet. I´m a young male. I like to dominate. If you think old greek pensioners are on my radar you are mistaken. I don´t even care about greek debt. Its a laughable small amaount for us.  What i care about is that we have the power to form a new society there. A better one than that pathetic country wee see there right now. 

 

In short: it simply feels good to create so much desperation there while it has zero effects on ourself. Why does it feel good? Because the pompous big words losers like tsipras and his varofakis clown made at the beginning. Its funny to see them crwal now. 

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Guest PatrickT

yeah right .... carry on with your steroids treatment

 

spiegel20062015-225x300.jpg

 

CHpWPgfVEAAraTu.jpg

 

160236_600.jpg

 

CH1A-5sUYAAA6I0.jpg

 

 

Funny you stick to personal insults again old guy.

 

meanwhile in germany:

 

http://www.wsj.com/articles/germany-enjoys-record-year-for-trade-1423480347

 

P.s. while most greeks in my age struggle to earn their living i have another problem. What would you suggest. I did already book all land tours for our cruise in december but don´t know what exactly to do the first two days on the seychelles. There is one option to go the entire two days on praslin, sleep in a hotel right in the palm forrest near the beach. Or make two different tours, each at one day. The price is the same roughly 500 €. 

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Guest eyoismos

please explain to everybody what the germany economy and its success has to do with the vitriol you continuously spew non stop against greece, and amazingly , ....though you deny deny deny, .....is right down the bild alley as pointed out earlier in the article

 

and while you are at it, tell your dilemma to your fellow compatriot almost 3 million unemployed - maybe they can help you get that log out of your self opinionated ass

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Guest PatrickT

please explain to everybody what the germany economy and its success has to do with the vitriol you continuously spew non stop against greece, and amazingly , ....though you deny deny deny, .....is right down the bild alley as pointed out earlier in the article

 

and while you are at it, tell your dilemma to your fellow compatriot almost 3 million unemployed - maybe they can help you get that log out of your self opinionated ass

we have the lowest unemployment rate ever, Of course you always have a core group of hardcore associals who can nothing and so are unemployed.

 

The thing is, we wasted 5 years on greece. Our tax money wasted on a country that did never anything positive for us. If the roles were reversed i wonder if greks would help us. I doubt.

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Guest eyoismos

we have the lowest unemployment rate ever, Of course you always have a core group of hardcore associals who can nothing and so are unemployed.

8 million plus registered foreigners in germany, in fact its estimated that about 1/5 of the german population are of migrant stock somewhere along th line ... i wonder how many are actually unemployed. could i hazzard a guess that most unemployed are actually germans?  so ... ask them about your plans and dilemma

 

 

The thing is, we wasted 5 years on greece. Our tax money wasted on a country that did never anything positive for us. If the roles were reversed i wonder if greks would help us. I doubt.

 

 

 

Gregory Claeys, an economist with Bruegel, a Bruxelles based think-tank replied:

“For the moment, the Greek debt crisis has cost European taxpayers nothing. The reason is that the help given by the European partners to Greece has been provided purely through loans.

 

Finance Minister Wolfgang Schäuble insisted on Tuesday that the new deal aimed at slashing Greece's debt load won't cost German taxpayers

 

 

and here is the ultimate irony of it all ....

 

A German company was found to be the biggest tax evader in Greece. A court in Athens found that Hochtief, the German company that was running the “Eleftherios Venizelos” Athens International airport was not paying VAT for 20 years. It is estimated that Hochtief, will have to pay more than 500 million Euros for VAT arrears. Together with other outstanding payments, like those to social security funds, it might have to py more than 1 billion Euros.

 

 

in other words you are talking through your ring piece as usual

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Guest PatrickT

As usual you believe that its the people in greece who matter. I give you a hint. They don´t matter at all. Their fate is absolutely irrelevant. If something is too weak for life it should die. Good things are born in battle. The entire life is a fight. We all fight. If greeks die because they starve so be it. Forgive me, but my mercy towards people who are on the floor is pretty limited. 

 

I only care for our interests and power. All decissions must aim to the greatest profit for germany and the german people. If this interests include the wellbeing of the greek people: good. If our interests mean that greek people get crushed, so be it.

 

The greek debt crisis is peanuts for us. There are other things in the background far greater and more important. 

 

It is positive for us to hold greece in our grip. If we go for GREXIT we lose our power over greece in large parts. On the other hand we would lose influence if we allow Syriza ruling greece. The poorer european nations like slovenia or poland demand a hard stand against the syriza idiots.

 

The tactic followed here is too make life for greeks as hard as possible. Why do you think we push greece on the edge of the cliff? the greek people suffer. They revolt against syriza. They take the money of their banks and we allow this to happen. They transfer it outside greece. Mostly into EU banks. We guarantee this to happen with ELA credits from the ECB. That way real greek whealth is transferred outside greece and backed up inside greece with some lame statistics and numbers. The greek pensions are irrelevant. Greece is a country without social security. People who lose their job lose evrything after one year. Evry greek who loses his job is a victory for the system. The misery grows and so does the pressure on greece.

 

The IWF and Lagarde are the bad cop in this charade while chancellor Merkel plays the good cop. Lagarde and the IWF stand outside the system and serve as ideal target for criticism. Its no wonder that the IWF takes the hardest stand against greece.

 

So comrade i hope you stop talking about unemployed or pensions or even debt. Thats not even the topic behind all of this. Nor is it the greek people. The fate of your people is irrelevant. 

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Guest PatrickT

And i would like to add something. I was born in 1992 in Rostock. Thats a city in eastern germany. After the reunion in 1990 eastern germany suffered terrible. Almost all big production places closed down. several hundredthousand people lost their job. My mother was one of them. I remember my childhood that we always had a tight budget but my parents tried evrything they could to make me happy and i appreciate that. Eastern germans worked hard to better the situation and germany as a whole did a great job in that unification process. There was no help from anyone back then. 

 

It is strange isn´t it? I can´t remember. What was greek help back then for germany? As far as i know there never was any greek help for germany at all. My guess most greeks did not care. :) But they cry for help now. 

 

Two years ago we had a terrible flood in germany. Many cities suffered much then and we were happy about evry help. Poor tunisiaeven send several tons of dates for our firefighters. That might only be a symbolic act but was appreciated.

 

What did greece send? As far as i know nothing. :)

 

So in all honesty you may understand that my feelings towards a parasitic nation that did never anything good for anyone are kinda small. 

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Guest eyoismos

unfucking believable !!!!

 

2 years ago greece was having serious political crises, one after the other, government in power barely hold onto power with the skin of its teeth, enforced structural adjustments where put in place which resulted in an all time EU record of unemployment, greek suicide rates exploded, so many, and i mean SO MANY people had reached the point of searching garbages for food, and this arsehole keeps on bring up that greece didnt help germany with her floods ....repeatedly and everywhere on this forum .... just like a crackhead with a switchblade  - so ghetto of him

 

and he neednt have bothered to tell us that he is from eastern germany... we already strongly suspected at that ...he just confirmed it - far too many indications of that particular mentality .... only thing missing is where the stasi influence (and its predecessor naturally) comes in ...and then everything will fall into place

 

and whats worse ... he obviously thinks that the hardass approach will make greeks hate syriza ... hasnt a clue how greeks think... if anything support for syriza has soared last time i looked (as far as dealing with the lenders ) .... only because she got in your face with the same lenders .... (of course internally, is in greece .... people as starting to bitch like crazy that nothing has been finalized, and some are even going ape  ...but that is another story)

http://greece.greekreporter.com/2015/04/01/opinion-poll-greeks-in-support-of-syriza-govt-but-afraid-of-grexit/

 

but the best part ... ("best" being sarcastic) ... he throws this "rub in your face and fuck you " attitude about his dilemma of where to spend is pseudo Nouveau riche mentality finavial well to do ... obviously aimed to insult ... and when one suggests that he throws that kinda attitude  at his almost 3 million unemployed compatriots to see what he would get .... he interprets it as  .... "As usual you believe that its the people in greece who matter"

 

and then he gets all offended when he gets insulted back in spades ...

 

so easy to dish it out ...but cant handle taking it ... typical bully mentality ...and i have raised this characteristic about this moron before - thank god most germans are not like that ... proof is ....

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jun/21/german-tourists-greece-thessaloniki

and i quote ....

 

only one person had been slightly frosty towards Jost – and that was a German whom she had asked for directions.

that one tosser could only have been patrick or a patrick wannabe

 

but like i said .... steroids have mashed his brains

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Guest

most people on this planet get by on 1 Euro a day and still manage to be far more productive than Greeks.

But you seem to think that the world has to provide plenty so that the Greeks can eat and shit. That is all they do.

 

Let the lazy good for nothing bastards die already.

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unfucking believable !!!!

 

2 years ago greece was having serious political crises, one after the other, government in power barely hold onto power with the skin of its teeth, enforced structural adjustments where put in place which resulted in an all time EU record of unemployment, greek suicide rates exploded, so many, and i mean SO MANY people had reached the point of searching garbages for food, and this arsehole keeps on bring up that greece didnt help germany with her floods ....repeatedly and everywhere on this forum .... just like a crackhead with a switchblade  - so ghetto of him

 

and he neednt have bothered to tell us that he is from eastern germany... we already strongly suspected at that ...he just confirmed it - far too many indications of that particular mentality .... only thing missing is where the stasi influence (and its predecessor naturally) comes in ...and then everything will fall into place

 

and whats worse ... he obviously thinks that the hardass approach will make greeks hate syriza ... hasnt a clue how greeks think... if anything support for syriza has soared last time i looked (as far as dealing with the lenders ) .... only because she got in your face with the same lenders .... (of course internally, is in greece .... people as starting to bitch like crazy that nothing has been finalized, and some are even going ape  ...but that is another story)

http://greece.greekreporter.com/2015/04/01/opinion-poll-greeks-in-support-of-syriza-govt-but-afraid-of-grexit/

 

but the best part ... ("best" being sarcastic) ... he throws this "rub in your face and fuck you " attitude about his dilemma of where to spend is pseudo Nouveau riche mentality finavial well to do ... obviously aimed to insult ... and when one suggests that he throws that kinda attitude  at his almost 3 million unemployed compatriots to see what he would get .... he interprets it as  .... "As usual you believe that its the people in greece who matter"

 

and then he gets all offended when he gets insulted back in spades ...

 

so easy to dish it out ...but cant handle taking it ... typical bully mentality ...and i have raised this characteristic about this moron before - thank god most germans are not like that ... proof is ....

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jun/21/german-tourists-greece-thessaloniki

and i quote ....

 

that one tosser could only have been patrick or a patrick wannabe

 

but like i said .... steroids have mashed his brains

thanks for proving me right. You really do believe that greeks matter. I give you a hint, tunisia had a revolution and helped. There is no poverty in greece. It just reached its natural level that it can have with the work it is able to do. As lagarde said: i saw no poverty in greece but in somalia.

 

And that you repeatedly try to insult me personal just shows your massive dementia.

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Guest eyoismos

anybody notice how easily ajaxmonkey and patrick freely give "likes" to each other? anybody notice how much similar the vitriol being distributed?

 

makes one wonder

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Guest eyoismos

 As lagarde said: i saw no poverty in greece but in somalia.

 

 

any relationship to this woman

 

 

Another unfortunate event was to hit Lagarde in 2012, significantly damaging her credibility. Having lectured wealthy businessmen over avoiding paying their taxes, as well as governments for not doing enough to capture them, Lagarde was revealed to be somewhat of a hypocrite. 

......

She added, “As far as Athens is concerned, I also think about all those people who are trying to escape tax all the time. All these people in Greece who are trying to escape tax.” She went onto say that she saw little difference between Greeks avoiding paying taxes and those facing cuts in public services, and they should collectively “help themselves” by paying their taxes.

However, it was quickly revealed that while she was happy to tell others they should be expected to pay their way, she was herself enjoying a tax-free existence. Her almost $500,000 a year salary at the IMF is exempt from taxes as she is an official at an international institution. It is a startling piece of hypocrisy, especially as she is paid more than even President Barack Obama, and he pays taxes on his salary. While she is not alone in enjoying these benefits – World Bank and UN employees also enjoy them – it is pretty rich of her to be lecturing others on paying their taxes when she herself doesn’t.

 

 

we wont even talk about the Tapie incident

 

maybe according to you we should make her an honorary greek citizen

 

idiot

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Guest eyoismos

And that you repeatedly try to insult me personal just shows your massive dementia.

like i have said repeatedly

 

and then he gets all offended when he gets insulted back in spades ...

 

so easy to dish it out ...but cant handle taking it ... typical bully mentality ...and i have raised this characteristic about this moron before -

 

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Guest eyoismos

thanks for proving me right. You really do believe that greeks matter.

of course i believe greeks matter

 

just as much as a believe that those almost 3 million unemployed germans matter

 

but what the fuck do you care? all you care about is how to spend your money on vacations

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Guest

but what the fuck do you care? all you care about is how to spend your money on vacations

And what do you spend your money on?

Donations for your suffering Greek Compatriots?

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Yes, I do spend some money on donations for suffering Greek children. That's beyond the point though. There's a need for a radical change in Greece. Throwing money to good causes is not nearly enough.

 

Many people hoped that Syriza would bring about this change but this doesn't seem to be the case.

 

Most of all Greek people will need to change themselves. Change some of their bad habits, acquired during the past 20-25 years of laziness, and go back to their old hard working ways. And don't get me wrong. There are many hard working Greeks today too. But there are way more lazy good for nothing assholes who need to change their ways. Unfortunately Syriza seems to be validating the behaviour of those assholes and punish the hard working people with more taxes. This is not going to help Greece one bit.

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Guest PatrickT

of course i believe greeks matter

 

just as much as a believe that those almost 3 million unemployed germans matter

 

but what the fuck do you care? all you care about is how to spend your money on vacations

 

 

Maybe those 3 million unemployed germans should take a job then. We have full employment. Being unemployed is a choice in germany. 

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